Index of Truth

Beauty is a more reliable index of truth than reason.

thelatvian:

Fernan Federici – Microscopic Photographs of Plants

These surreal images are microscopic photographs of various plants, taken by Dr. Fernan Federici. He is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Cambridge working in the area of Synthetic Biology. He started his career studying two years of Engineering at the Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Mendoza, Argentina) and then moved to Chile to obtain an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology. Later he moved to England to do a PhD in Biological Sciences at Cambridge. Each of Federici’s photographs depicts the cellular life of a different form of flora, from rainforest specimen to coniferous forest inhabitants. The plants’ bright colors, hollow-looking cells and overall intensity make for some absolutely stunning photographs that are both visually arresting and thought-provoking. The vibrant and detailed photographs show just how intricate and beautiful nature really is.

(via galaxyclusters)

tiramasu:

the-13th-floor:

“Beware of Artists” - Actual poster issued by Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1950s, at height of the red scare.


crazy

tiramasu:

the-13th-floor:

“Beware of Artists” - Actual poster issued by Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1950s, at height of the red scare.

crazy

(via sheimplied)

astronomicalwonders:

An Galaxy Edge On - NGC 891

Galaxy NGC 891, or Caldwell 23, is an edge-on unbarred spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 6, 1784. The galaxy is a member of the NGC 1023 group of galaxies in the Local Supercluster.

NGC 891 looks as we think the Milky Way would look like when viewed edge-on (some astronomers have even noted how similar to NGC 891 our galaxy looks as seen from the Southern Hemisphere) and in fact both galaxies are considered very similar in terms of luminosity and size; studies of the dynamics of its molecular hydrogen have also proven the likely presence of a central bar. Despite this, recent high-resolution images of its dusty disk show unusual filamentary patterns. These patterns are extending into the halo of the galaxy, away from its galactic disk. Scientists presume that supernova explosions caused this interstellar dust to be thrown out of the galactic disk toward the halo.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

(via galaxyclusters)